Baptist Chapel, North Road

Former Baptist Chapel

North Road

Church c19th century, now flats.

Locally listed.

History

Victorian Chapel of yellow stock brick. Now converted into flats

Baptist Chapel, North Road
Baptist Chapel, North Road

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4 thoughts on “Former Baptist Chapel

  1. Was this known as ‘The Park Chapel’ Old Brentdord? If so my great granddad was married there in 1880, anyone have any idea where the registers would be now?

    1. Park Baptist Church was in Boston Road just north of Brentford Station and isn’t the one pictured in North Road.
      The Great West Road (A4) runs next to the site now but it was in open country when it was first built – thus Park.
      Their records might be at the London Metropolitan Archives.
      If not Celia Cotton at the brentford high street project website http://www.bhsproject.co.uk should be able to help or the local studies library in Chiswick.
      localstudies-hct@carillionservices.co.uk

      If you have Brentford connections you might be interested in the high street project for old pictures and family histories.

  2. Definitely North Road Baptist Church. I went to Sunday School here from 1958 – 1970. Stangely Sunday School ran form 2.45 – 3.45 pm every Sunday.
    The Fromow family who ran a nursery garden in Chiswick were very involved. The misses Fromow ran the Sunday School for the younger children. Each Christmas every child was given a little tin of homemade toffees – they collected the tins all year – plus a handknitted hat, scarf or mittens.
    Each year there were two special services, the Sunday School prize giving and the church anniversary service. Each child attending would be give a book, a prize for attendance. They would also be given a hyacinth in a pot – pink for the girls and blue for the boys at one service which must have been in the autumn. I can still remember the smell of the hyacinths which sat on the window ledges during the service. Each child also received a paperbag containing an apple, an orange, and a banana. It seems strange now, but people in that area were poor, and the church recognised that.
    The Fromow family had adopted a little girl, who was found with the tops of her fingers missing due to frostbite, lying next to her dead mother in circa 1915 a result of the Armenian Genocide by the Ottoman Empire. As an adult the girl, Miss Shakarian helped in Sunday School and played a small pedal -powered portable organ. This was sometimes carried around the streets and a group would sing hymns and choruses on street corners.
    Every summer the church, or chapel as we called it, organised a day trip to the seaside. People paid weekly for their ticket – no one could afford to pay the coach fare in one hit. We gathered at the church for prayers before jumping on the coach to Brighton, Eastbourne, Worthing or Little Hampton.
    My family, probably much to the disapproval of the church would then go the the North Star pub at the other end of North Road for a drink, with us children – my brother Carl, my cousins, Paul and Roy and myself, and Denise and Lorraine Ovens being left outside with a lemonade.

  3. I so enjoyed your reminiscences. My family attended North Road Chapel and taught in the Sunday school/Bible Class. My Dad was the artist Lewis Lupton and used to do talks which he illustrated on a black board.
    I well remember the Fromows and the paper bags with fruit which we loved. Yes they did adopt Azadouhie Shakarian, she used to baby sit for us, was a great family friend. Later she worked at Mr Williams Chemist.

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